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Centre:Mk Discovers Brits Believe In The Power Of Little Changes

Dramatic lifestyle changes like new exercise regimes, cutting alcohol intake and eating less meat typically last less than two months, according to a new study commissioned by centre:mk.

The survey revealed that Brits stick to a new habit for an average of just seven weeks before giving it up, while 21 per cent only keep at it for a month.


The study of 2,000 adults, was carried out as part of the centre’s new campaign to help shoppers make small changes to their lifestyle that can have significant beneficial long term results.


More than half (53 per cent) of Brits have tried to make positive changes to their habits in the past year but failed to keep them up, including eating less meat and more salad, turning lights off when not in the room and having more ‘me’ time.


Others have unsuccessfully tried to cycle or walk instead of driving, go to bed earlier and hit 10,000 steps a day. Reducing their sugar intake, using their phone less and cutting back on alcohol were also among the top 40 changes people have tried to make.


It also emerged that 54 per cent of respondents have vowed to only make little changes to their lifestyle from now on, with 72 per cent believing they are more achievable and realistic than bigger shifts. The study also found 67 per cent of adults are more likely to fail at sticking to a lifestyle change if they attempt too many at once.


Kim Priest, Head of Marketing at centre:mk, said: “We all have goals we want to implement into our lifestyles, but often it’s easier said than done. Our new campaign is designed to give people ideas and life hacks to help them make one small change at a time that can have a big impact in the long run. It’s easier to concentrate on smaller adjustments and give it all your focus rather than feeling overwhelmed by lots of big changes to diet, fitness, finances and environmental habits.”


Reasons for implementing changes initially included improving physical health (32 per cent), saving money (31 per cent) and to do their bit for the planet (24 per cent). Lack of willpower (27 per cent), motivation (27 per cent) and time (20 per cent) resulted in failing.

Situations including a health scare (25 per cent) and becoming a parent or grandparent (21 per cent) made people want to make a change. The likes of social media (21 per cent) and the news (19 per cent) have also inspired people to overhaul their habits, as well as family (30 per cent) and friends (27 per cent).

In addition, 74 per cent believe that if everyone made a small environmental change to their lifestyle, it would collectively have a big impact on the planet. 48 per cent of those polled have made more adjustments to their lifestyle as they’ve got older.

centre:mk’s Little Things campaign is running alongside an exhibition and plaques throughout the centre that highlight the little things the team are doing across the centre from saving energy, reducing waste and CO2, as well as making a difference to the wider community.

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